James Hillman

MicroGlyphics Home
For Graphics Click Here

URLYearReleasedEditionBinding

A Terrible Love of War
Why do we love war? asks Jungian psychoanalyst Hillman, author of the bestselling The Soul's Code . One might ask in reply, Do we, in fact, love war? Hillman answers unequivocally in the affirmative, skewering modern pretension to prefer the Prince of Peace to the god of war. Mars is the central character in Hillman's exploration of war as an archetypal impulse. "The whole bloody business," he writes, "reveals a god, therewith placing war among the authentic phenomena of religion. And that is why it is so terrible, so loved, and so hard to understand." His portrayal of war as an implacable force, a primary element of the human condition, is unsettling, as is his description of war as a "beautiful horror," but he cites enough memoirs and letters written by those in the heat of battle to convince that it can have a kind of beauty for combatants. Hillman also effectively evokes the transcendent, Mars-like fury that overtakes soldiers in battle ("I felt like a god... I was untouchable," writes one). Throughout, Hillman offers other disturbing insights: readers may feel a shock of recognition when he compares our addiction to viewing war (whether real or cinematic) to the viewing of pornography, noting that we are all voyeurs. But Hillman's mesmerizing prose loses its impact when he launches a sneering attack on Christianity (and the U.S., where "we are all Christians") for being a warrior religion. And perhaps only Jungians will understand his baffling assertion that aesthetic passion (or, in archetypal terms, devotion to Venus) can slow our ceaseless rush to war.


Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2004 n/a Hard
A Blue Fire
Selected Writings
1991n/aSoft
Anima
The Anatomy of a Personified Notion
One of the most important concepts in Jungian psychology is that of the anima. According to Jung, the anima is the subconscious feminine element in every man, Its counterpart in women is the animus, the masculine inner personality. In order to achieve psychological maturity, we must learn to listen to the voices from the collective unconscious and so discover the rich psychic world that lies within and around us. In Anima, James Hillman defines the anima and shows how we can best deal with its mystery. The book is formatted such that Hillman's essays are on the right hand pages, while Quotations from Jung's works are on the left.
1985n/aSoft
Archetypal Psychology
A Brief Account
1997ReprintSoft
Dream Animals

One of our most provocative Jungian thinkers, James Hillman joins with artist Margot McLean to create a hauntingly beautiful reflection on the role of animals in our dreams and imaginings. The weaving together of beautiful watercolors and absorbing essays makes a stimulating volume for understanding the human spirit. 35 full-color illustrations.
1997n/aHard
Emotion
A Comprehensive Phenomenology of Theories and Their Meaning for Therapy
19921st Paperback EditionSoft
Haiti
Or the Psychology of Black (Spring, 61)
1997n/aSoft
Healing Fiction

In this work, Hillman's main deconstruction of therapy, he asks "What does the soul want?" and answers "Fictions that heal." By examining the three Great Originators of depth psychology--Freud, Jung, and Adler--this book looks again at what is really meant by "case history," "active imagination," and "inferiority feelings."
1994ReprintSoft
Insearch
Psychology and Religion (The Jungian Classics Series, 2)
Insearch: Psychology and Religion is one of the few enduring descriptions of Jungian therapy in its relation to religion. In four insightful chapters (The Human Encounter, The Unconscious as Experience, The Inner Morality of the Shadow, and The Inner Feminine or Anima) James Hillman gives a comprehensive account of Jungian psychology. His examples are fresh, his language easy, and the evident pleasure he takes in opening the great questions of the soul make Insearch a basic text and seminal work, an introduction to psychotherapy and a consistently quoted reference for pastoral counseling.
19942nd Revised & EnhancedSoft
Kinds of Power
A Guide to Its Intelligent Uses
A study on the nature of power reveals its sources in the mind, body, and emotions, and demonstrates how leaders can become more effective through two dozen expressions of power including influence, resistance, and ambition.
1997n/aSoft
Men and the Life of Desire

1991CassetteAudio
Pan and the Nightmare

2000n/aSoft
Pink Madness
Why Does Aphrodite Drive Men Crazy With Pornography?
1995CassetteAudio
Re-Visioning Psychology

1992ReissueSoft
The City As Dwelling
Walking, Sitting, Shaping
These addresses were delivered at the seminar, "The City as Dwelling." They direct our attention back to the center--the heart--of our urban community, to the often overlooked activities which shape and form our daily lives.
1995n/aSoft
The Dream and the Underworld

1979n/aSoft
The Force of Character
(Large Print)
This philosophy/psychology work on character and aging is not a self-help book but rather a self-perception book--philosophical, wise, and deep. "What does aging serve? What is its point?" asks James Hillman, and proceeds to examine those questions fully. The loss of short-term memory, for example, enables us to better recall the past and review our lives. "On the one hand, brain cells may be flaking off like autumn leaves in a deciduous forest; on the other hand, a clearing is being made, leaving more space for occasional birds to alight." Hillman also likens short-term memory loss to a warehouse packed full of the inventory of life, emptying the latest files "to preserve enough emotional space for evaluating what has been there for a long time." Other aging markers also have benefits for character, reflection, and imagination. We wake up at night not only because our old bodies have to urinate, for example, but also because our minds are open to the wonders and mysteries of night.
1999n/aSoft
The Force of Character

This philosophy/psychology work on character and aging is not a self-help book but rather a self-perception book--philosophical, wise, and deep. "What does aging serve? What is its point?" asks James Hillman, and proceeds to examine those questions fully. The loss of short-term memory, for example, enables us to better recall the past and review our lives. "On the one hand, brain cells may be flaking off like autumn leaves in a deciduous forest; on the other hand, a clearing is being made, leaving more space for occasional birds to alight." Hillman also likens short-term memory loss to a warehouse packed full of the inventory of life, emptying the latest files "to preserve enough emotional space for evaluating what has been there for a long time." Other aging markers also have benefits for character, reflection, and imagination. We wake up at night not only because our old bodies have to urinate, for example, but also because our minds are open to the wonders and mysteries of night.
1999n/aHard
The Force of Character
(Abridged)
This philosophy/psychology work on character and aging is not a self-help book but rather a self-perception book--philosophical, wise, and deep. "What does aging serve? What is its point?" asks James Hillman, and proceeds to examine those questions fully. The loss of short-term memory, for example, enables us to better recall the past and review our lives. "On the one hand, brain cells may be flaking off like autumn leaves in a deciduous forest; on the other hand, a clearing is being made, leaving more space for occasional birds to alight." Hillman also likens short-term memory loss to a warehouse packed full of the inventory of life, emptying the latest files "to preserve enough emotional space for evaluating what has been there for a long time." Other aging markers also have benefits for character, reflection, and imagination. We wake up at night not only because our old bodies have to urinate, for example, but also because our minds are open to the wonders and mysteries of night.
1999CassetteAudio
The Force of Character

This philosophy/psychology work on character and aging is not a self-help book but rather a self-perception book--philosophical, wise, and deep. "What does aging serve? What is its point?" asks James Hillman, and proceeds to examine those questions fully. The loss of short-term memory, for example, enables us to better recall the past and review our lives. "On the one hand, brain cells may be flaking off like autumn leaves in a deciduous forest; on the other hand, a clearing is being made, leaving more space for occasional birds to alight." Hillman also likens short-term memory loss to a warehouse packed full of the inventory of life, emptying the latest files "to preserve enough emotional space for evaluating what has been there for a long time." Other aging markers also have benefits for character, reflection, and imagination. We wake up at night not only because our old bodies have to urinate, for example, but also because our minds are open to the wonders and mysteries of night.
2000n/aSoft
The Myth of Analysis
Three Essays in Archetypal Psychology
1998ReprintSoft
The Soul's Code
In Search of Character and Calling
What set of factors most influence the course of an individual human life? Nature? Nurture? The choices a person makes, including one's intimate relationships? Or is it the complex interplay of all of these? For Jungian analyst and prolific writer Hillman (Kinds of Power, 1995, etc.), the correct answer is apparently ``none of the above.'' Rather, Hillman focuses single-mindedly on each person's special daimon, an abstract, almost mystical notion lifted from Neoplatonic thought that he defines…
From Kirkus Reviews , June 1, 1996
1997CassetteAudio
The Soul's Code
In Search of Character and Calling
James Hillman, a former director of the Jung Institute who has written more than 20 books on behavior and psychology, delves into human development in The Soul's Code. Hillman encourages you to "grow down" into the earth, as an acorn does when it becomes a mighty oak tree. He argues that character and calling are the result of "the particularity you feel to be you" and knocks those who blame childhood difficulties for all their problems as adults. According to Hillman, "The current American identity as a victim is the flip side of the coin whose head brightly displays the opposite identity: the heroic self-made man, carving out destiny alone and with unflagging will." Hillman's theories seem disarmingly simple, but he backs them with a careful, well-practiced intellect.
1997n/aSoft
The Thought of the Heart and the Soul of the World

1992n/aSoft

Labelled with ICRA!

Last Updated: March 7, 2005 5:58 PM

\n