Erich Neumann

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Amor and Psyche
The Psychic Development of the Feminine : A Commentary on the Tale by Apuleius (Mythos : The Princeton/Bollingen Series in World Mythology)
The renowned tale of Amor and Psyche, from Apuleius's second-century Latin novel The Golden Ass, is one of the most charming fragments of classical literature. Neumann chose it as the exemplar of an unusual study of feminine psychology. Unfolding the spiritual and mythical background of the pagan narrative, he shows how the contest between the mortal maid Psyche and the great goddess Aphrodite over the god Amor--Aphrodite's son, Psyche's husband--yields surprising and valuable insights into the psychic life of women.
Great Mother an Analysis of the Archetype
Neumann examines how the Feminine has been experienced and expressed in many cultures from prehistory to our own time. Appearing as goddess and demon, gate and pillar, garden and tree, hovering sky and containing vessel, the Feminine is seen as an essential factor in the dialectical relation of individual consciousness, symbolized by the child, to the ungraspable matrix, symbolized by the Great Mother.
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The Fear of the Feminine
And Other Essays on Feminine Psychology, Vol. 4
These essays by the famous analytical psychologist and student of creativity Erich Neumann belong in the context of the depth psychology of culture and reveal a prescient concern about the one-sidedness of patriarchal Western civilization. Neumann recommended a "cultural therapy" that he thought would redress a "fundamental ignorance" about feminine and masculine psychology, and he looked for societal healing to a "matriarchal consciousness" that forms the bridge between the feminine and the creative.

Brought together here for the first time, the essays in the book discuss the psychological stages of woman's development, the moon and matriarchal consciousness, Mozart's Magic Flute, the meaning of the earth archetype for modern times, and the fear of the feminine. In Mozart's fantastic world, Neumann saw a true Auseinandersetzung--the conflict and coming-to-terms with each other of the matriarchal and the patriarchal worlds. Developing such a synthesis of the feminine and the masculine in the psychic reality of the individual and of the collective was, he argued, one of the fundamental, future-oriented tasks of both the society and the individual.
The Origins and History of Consciousness
(Bollingen Series, 42)
The first of Erich Neumann's works to be translated into English, this eloquent book draws on a full range of world mythology to show that individual consciousness undergoes the same archetypal stages of development as has human consciousness as a whole. Neumann, one of Jung's most creative students and a renowned practitioner of analytical psychology in his own right, shows how the stages begin and end with the symbol of the Uroboros, or tail-eating serpent. The intermediate stages are projected in the universal myths of the World Creation, Great Mother, Separation of the World Parents, Birth of the Hero, Slaying of the Dragon, Rescue of the Captive, and Transformation and Deification of the Hero. Throughout the sequence the Hero is the evolving ego consciousness.
The Place of Creation
The Israeli analytical psychologist Erich Neumann, whom C. G. Jung regarded as one of his most gifted students, devoted much of his later writing to the theme of creativity. This is the third volume of Neumann's essays on that subject. Neumann found his examples not only in the work of writers and artists--William Blake, Goethe, Rilke, Kafka, Klee, Chagall, Picasso, Trakl--but as well in that of physicists, biologists, psychiatrists, and philosophers. Confronting the problem of portraying men and women as creative beings, Neumann expanded the concepts of Jungian psychology with a more comprehensive definition of the archetype and a new concept--"unitary reality." Whether or not humanity can be restored to health from its present situation as a self-endangered species depends, according to Neumann, on whether we can experience ourselves as truly creative, in touch with our own being and the world's being. The six essays comprising this volume--"The Psyche and the Transformation of the Reality Planes," "The Experience of the Unitary Reality," "Creative Man and the `Great Experience,'" "Man and Meaning," "Peace as the Symbol of Life," and "The Psyche as the Place of Creation"--all originated as lectures at the Eranos Conferences in the years 1952 to 1960.

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Last Updated: 07/31/2003 15:00